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Know the Laws that Can Protect Your Child

Overview: 

Children with ADHD and Education Rights

Federal laws help children with ADHD get an appropriate education

Section 504 establishes equal educational opportunities

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) gives financial help to local education agencies

Your child with ADHD may benefit from these laws

READ FULL ARTICLE 

Help ensure that your child's educational needs are met. Download these documents to learn how.

Comparison of the IDEA and Section 504
(PDF Document)
A Parent's Guide to Section 504 in Public Schools
(PDF Document)
Checklist for Determining Legal Eligibility of ADHD Students
(PDF Document)
Sample Letter Requesting School Officials Evaluate Your Child
(Word Document)

Documents in PDF format can be viewed with the free Adobe Reader.

Know the Laws that Can Protect Your Child

Children with ADHD and Education Rights

Federal laws help children with ADHD get an appropriate education

Section 504 establishes equal educational opportunities

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) gives financial help to local education agencies

Your child with ADHD may benefit from these laws

Children with ADHD have basic educational rights that are protected by federal laws. These laws were created for children with disabilities, including ADHD, to help provide an appropriate education designed to meet their individual needs.

One of these laws is Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It's a federal civil rights law that says that programs and activities that receive federal funds can't discriminate against a child because of disability. In addition, eligible children are provided with accommodations that can help level the playing field for children with ADHD. Students who are eligible under Section 504 must be given assistance that ensures they have equal opportunities when compared to their same-age, non-disabled peers.

Another law protecting children with disabilities is the IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. This law provides federal financial help to state and local education agencies. The IDEA establishes that all eligible children with disabilities receive special education and related aids and services. These services must be made available to eligible children at no cost to parents.

How do you know if these laws can help your child? First, you'll need to find out if your child qualifies for assistance. Section 504 and the IDEA have different requirements. Eligibility depends on the severity of your child's ADHD symptoms, their educational need, and how much extra support they need.

Since Section 504 works within your child's existing public school regular education classes, it's usually the simpler path to take. Eligibility is broader with fewer requirements than the IDEA. If your child simply needs a little extra help and attention, looking into Section 504 may be an appropriate choice to request.

Getting help through the IDEA can be a bit more complicated. It requires that parents know more about the qualifying process, and be active participants. This may seem daunting, but the aid and support offered by the IDEA is more extensive and specific to your child's needs. Because of this, many parents choose this path.

CONCERTA® has teamed with an expert on educational rights for children with ADHD to help you learn more about Section 504 and the IDEA. There's also a sample letter for requesting an evaluation to see if your child qualifies for assistance. Download these documents for detailed answers and advice about your child's educational rights.


Help ensure that your child's educational needs are met. Download these documents to learn how.

Comparison of the IDEA and Section 504
(PDF Document)
A Parent's Guide to Section 504 in Public Schools
(PDF Document)
Checklist for Determining Legal Eligibility of ADHD Students
(PDF Document)
Sample Letter Requesting School Officials Evaluate Your Child
(Word Document)

Documents in PDF format can be viewed with the free Adobe Reader.

CONCERTA® is a prescription product approved for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as part of a total treatment program that may include counseling or other therapies.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Talk to your healthcare professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. Only a healthcare professional can decide whether medication is right for you or your child.

CONCERTA® should not be taken by patients who have: allergies to methylphenidate or other ingredients in CONCERTA® significant anxiety, tension, or agitation; glaucoma; tics, Tourette's syndrome, or family history of Tourette's syndrome; current or past use of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI); esophagus, stomach, or intestinal narrowing. Children under 6 years of age should not take CONCERTA®.

Abuse of methylphenidate may lead to dependence. Tell your healthcare professional if you or your child has had problems with alcohol or drugs; has had any heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems; has had depression, abnormal thoughts or visions, bipolar disorder, or seizure. Contact your healthcare professional immediately if you or your child: develops abnormal thinking or hallucinations, abnormal or extreme moods and/or excessive activity; or if aggressive behavior or hostility develops or worsens while taking CONCERTA®. Your child's healthcare professional should check height and weight often and may interrupt CONCERTA® treatment if your child is not growing or gaining weight as expected.

Stimulants may impair the ability of the patient to operate potentially hazardous machinery or vehicles. Caution should be used accordingly until you are reasonably certain that CONCERTA® does not adversely affect your ability to engage in such activities.

The most common adverse reaction (>5%) reported in children and adolescents was upper abdominal pain. The most common adverse reactions (>10%) reported in adults were dry mouth, nausea, decreased appetite, headache, and insomnia.

CONCERTA® and OROS® are registered trademarks of ALZA Corporation

© Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved.

This site is published by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which is solely responsible for its contents. This site and its contents are intended for USA audiences only.